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Effect of Enzyme Type on the Properties of Chinese Sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis) Protein Hydrolysates Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis Process
Current Issue
Volume 6, 2019
Issue 1 (March)
Pages: 10-16   |   Vol. 6, No. 1, March 2019   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 6   Since Mar. 17, 2020 Views: 115   Since Mar. 17, 2020
Authors
[1]
Anwar Noman, State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Food Safety and Quality Control in Jiangsu Province, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China; Department of Agricultural Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Sana’a University, Sana’a, Yemen.
[2]
Abdelmoneim Hassan Ali, State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Food Safety and Quality Control in Jiangsu Province, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China.
[3]
Wedad Qasim Al-Bukhaiti, State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Food Safety and Quality Control in Jiangsu Province, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China.
[4]
Wenshui Xia, State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Food Safety and Quality Control in Jiangsu Province, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China.
Abstract
Protein hydrolysate is small fragments of peptides that contain many amino acids, and they can be prepared from fish meat and their by-products. The enzymatic hydrolysis process is the most effective method to recover the nutrients and bioactive peptides with preserving their nutritional value. In this study, papain and alcalase 2.4L enzymes have been employed to evaluate the preparation efficiency of protein hydrolysate from Chinese sturgeon by enzymatic hydrolysis process and its antioxidant properties. Papain was the more effective enzyme to obtain the highest degree of hydrolysis and yield, which were 20.62% and 16.77%, respectively. Increased degree of hydrolysis using papain led to an increase in the percentage of molecular weights (≤1 kDa), and total amino acids which were 98.26% and 97.82 g/100g protein, respectively. The solubility of the protein was significantly affected by enzyme type and pH, where the highest solubility was achieved by using the papain enzyme and pH 2, which was 97.39%. While alcalase 2.4L hydrolysate has achieved the highest antioxidant activities by DPPH and ABTS assays, which reached 81.42% and 87.75% at a hydrolysate concentration of 5 mg/mL, respectively. The findings indicate that papain and alcalase 2.4L enzymes can play a promising role in the production of fish protein hydrolysate with improved functional properties for potential food and pharmaceutical applications.
Keywords
Chinese Sturgeon, Papain, Alcalase 2.4L, Protein Hydrolysate, Antioxidant Properties
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