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Determination of Tryptophan and Glutamic Acid During Fermentation of Kiwi-based Milk by Different Combinations of Saccharomyces boulardii and Lactobacilli
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Volume 6, 2019
Issue 1 (March)
Pages: 1-5   |   Vol. 6, No. 1, March 2019   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 97   Since Mar. 6, 2019 Views: 408   Since Mar. 6, 2019
Authors
[1]
Ahmed Hassan Mousa, Department of Food and Dairy Science and Technology, Faculty of Environmental Agricultural Science, Arish University, El Arish, Egypt; State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China.
[2]
Gang Wang, State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China; International Joint Research Center for Probiotics & Gut Health, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China; (Yangzhou) Institute of Food Biotechnology, Jiangnan University, Yangzhou, China.
[3]
Hao Zhang, State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China; International Joint Research Center for Probiotics & Gut Health, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China; National Engineering Research Center for Functional Food, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China; (Yangzhou) Institute of Food Biotechnology, Jiangnan University, Yangzhou, China.
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the synergy interactions between Saccharomyces boulardii and preselected strains of lactobacilli during fermentation of skimmed milk fortified with kiwi juice (4% v/v) regarding tryptophan and glutamic acid production. The low capacity of S. boulardii in internalizing different sources of nitrogen produced marginal amounts of ≤0.66 mg/L (tryptophan) and ≤8.26 mg/L (glutamic acid) whether the milk was free or fortified with kiwi juice. The distinct production of tryptophan and glutamic acid were observed when the formulations were inoculated with lactobacilli and S. boulardii together. And so, the increased production was greater as much as ≤5.40 mg/L (tryptophan) and ≤12.09 mg/L (glutamic acid) when Lb. casei 20975 had a chance to grow in the milk with and without added kiwi juice where the S. boulardii was present. Lactobacilli strains could exercise its proteolytic system through cleavage of the higher molecular weight nitrogenous compounds. Indicating the presence of S. boulardii in the formulations where Lb. plantarum JXJ (6-12) or Lb. fermentum F16 were grown, the produced tryptophan and glutamic acid were at rapid rate and much more than those observed for the formulations inoculated with S. boulardii and Lb. plantarum RS (35-11), Lb. casei LCS, or Lb. fermentum F9.
Keywords
Saccharomyces boulardii, Kiwi Juice, Fermented Milk, Tryptophan, Glutamic Acid
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