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A Study on the Effects of Pain Stimulus on the Blood Pressure and Heart Rate of Undergraduate Medical Students - A Randomized Control Trial
Current Issue
Volume 6, 2019
Issue 2 (June)
Pages: 24-32   |   Vol. 6, No. 2, June 2019   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 3   Since Apr. 9, 2019 Views: 41   Since Apr. 9, 2019
Authors
[1]
Varsha Valery A/P Parameswaran, Faculty of Medicine, Melaka Manipal Medical College (Manipal Academy of Higher Education), Melaka, Malaysia.
[2]
Jayaprisshna A/P V. R. Soma Sundaram, Faculty of Medicine, Melaka Manipal Medical College (Manipal Academy of Higher Education), Melaka, Malaysia.
[3]
Aillilkumaran A/L Rajendran, Faculty of Medicine, Melaka Manipal Medical College (Manipal Academy of Higher Education), Melaka, Malaysia.
[4]
Vikneshilan Isaac Ganesh, Faculty of Medicine, Melaka Manipal Medical College (Manipal Academy of Higher Education), Melaka, Malaysia.
[5]
Yau Kim Boon, Faculty of Medicine, Melaka Manipal Medical College (Manipal Academy of Higher Education), Melaka, Malaysia.
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of pain stimulus on blood pressure and heart rate amongst students in Melaka Manipal Medical College, Muar campus. In this randomized-controlled trial study, 60 volunteers were randomized to Group A (intervention) and Group B (control) groups with sample size of 30 each. A questionnaire was given before the intervention to determine their androgyny and to screen for smoking and hypertension. Their systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) were assessed before any intervention. Participants were then admistered their respective intervention and their SBP, DBP, HR and Pain Score were assessed after 10 seconds and 30 seconds. Their anxiety was assessed after 30 seconds. Unpaired t-test was used to compare mean of both groups and paired t-test was used to compare the before and after of each variable. Our results showed that there were significant systolic blood pressure, pain score and anxiety results in group A compared to group B. However, there are no other significant differences in result between Group A and Group B. The results were analysed by Epi Info Version 7 and GraphPad software to calculate Unpaired t-test, Paired t-test and Chi-Square test. The conclusion is that this study shows that there was some relation between the cold pressor test causing pain and the participants systolic blood pressure after 30 seconds, pain score and anxiety. However, there was no relation between the pain stimulus and participants diastolic blood pressure and heart rate.
Keywords
Pain, Medical Students, Experiment
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