Welcome to Open Science
Contact Us
Home Books Journals Submission Open Science Join Us News
Evaluation of Industrial Effluent Levels in Kinawataka Stream, Its Tributaries and Kinawataka Swamp, Prior to Discharge into Lake Victoria
Current Issue
Volume 5, 2018
Issue 4 (August)
Pages: 49-56   |   Vol. 5, No. 4, August 2018   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 25   Since Sep. 1, 2018 Views: 1070   Since Sep. 1, 2018
Authors
[1]
William Wanasolo, Department of Chemistry, Kyambogo University, Kampala, Uganda.
[2]
Bernard Turyagenda Kiremire, Department of Chemistry, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
[3]
Frank Kansiime, Department of Environmental Management, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
Abstract
Industrialization has been expanding rapidly in Uganda particularly in Kampala City Council Authority. Nakawa and Ntinda happen to be among those areas with rapid industrial growth in this city. However, the environment in these industrial zones has not been given due attention with regard to its conservation and sustainability. The existing Kinawataka stream, its tributaries and Kinawataka swamp could be degraded with increasing industrial activity in this area. In this study, levels of heavy metals (zinc, copper, lead, cadmium and nickel), oil and grease, organic loads, oxidized nitrogen, total phosphorus and the physical properties of pH, conductivity and temperature were investigated in Kinawataka stream, its tributaries and Kinawataka swamp. Compared to background levels, results showed no significant quantities of heavy metals. The waste stabilization ponds in the area seemed to have high significant contributions to total phosphorus in the Kinawataka stream. It was concluded that the swamp exhibits an excellent character in moderating the hydrogen ions activity (acidity) of the streams, leading to no significant change in the mean pH values on the entire streams and this could have been due to the presence of the swamp.
Keywords
Kinawataka Swamp, Heavy Metals, Industrial, Effluent, Environment, Lake Victoria, Pollution
Reference
[1]
Vermeiren K., Van Rompaey A., Loopmans M., Serwajja E., and Mukwaya P. Urban growth of Kampala, Uganda: Pattern analysis and scenario development. Landscape and urban planning, 2012. 106 (2): 199-206.
[2]
Selassie A. A., Beyond Macroeconomic Stability: The Quest for Industrialization in Uganda 2008: International Monetary Fund.
[3]
Bugaari H., McNabb T., and Moorhouse T. The water hyacinth problem in Lake Victoria, East Africa. Kampala, Uganda, Aquatics Unlimited, Report WP-010298, 9p, 1998.
[4]
Kateregga E. and Sterner T. Indicators for an invasive species: Water hyacinths in Lake Victoria. Ecological Indicators, 2007. 7 (2): 362-70.
[5]
Matagi S. V. Some issues of environmental concern in Kampala, the capital city of Uganda. Environmental monitoring and assessment, 2002. 77 (2): 121-38.
[6]
Kansiime F., Nalubega M., Tukahirwa E., and Bugenyi F. The potential of Nakivubo swamp (papyrus wetland) in maintaining water quality of inner Murchison bay-Lake Victoria. African Journal of Tropical Hydrobiology and Fisheries, 1994. 5 (2): 79-87.
[7]
Russell J. M., McCoy S., Verschuren D., Bessems I., and Huang Y. Human impacts, climate change, and aquatic ecosystem response during the past 2000 yr at Lake Wandakara, Uganda. Quaternary Research, 2009. 72 (3): 315-24.
[8]
Dowhaniuk N., Hartter J., Ryan S. J., Palace M. W., and Congalton R. G. The impact of industrial oil development on a protected area landscape: demographic and social change at Murchison Falls Conservation Area, Uganda. Population and Environment, 2018. 39 (3): 197-218.
[9]
Kumari M. and Platel K. Bioaccessibility of trace elements and chromium speciation in commonly consumed cereals and pulses. International Journal of Food Properties, 2017. 20 (7): 1612-20.
[10]
Rivera N., Hesterberg D., Kaur N., and Duckworth O. W. Chemical Speciation of Potentially Toxic Trace Metals in Coal Fly Ash Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill. Energy & Fuels, 2017. 31 (9): 9652-9.
[11]
Noli F. and Tsamos P. Concentration of heavy metals and trace elements in soils, waters and vegetables and assessment of health risk in the vicinity of a lignite-fired power plant. Science of The Total Environment, 2016. 563: 377-85.
[12]
Ali H. and Khan E. Assessment of potentially toxic heavy metals and health risk in water, sediments, and different fish species of River Kabul, Pakistan. Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: An International Journal, 2018: 1-18.
[13]
Alsbou E. M. E. and Al-Khashman O. A. Heavy metal concentrations in roadside soil and street dust from Petra region, Jordan. Environmental monitoring and assessment, 2018. 190 (1): 48.
[14]
Men C., Liu R., Xu F., Wang Q., Guo L., and Shen Z. Pollution characteristics, risk assessment, and source apportionment of heavy metals in road dust in Beijing, China. Science of The Total Environment, 2018. 612: 138-47.
[15]
Govil P. K. and Krishna A. K., Soil and Water Contamination by Potentially Hazardous Elements: A Case History From India, in Environmental Geochemistry (Second Edition) 2018, Elsevier. p. 567-97.
[16]
Sobrino-Figueroa A. Toxic effect of commercial detergents on organisms from different trophic levels. Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 2018. 25 (14): 13283-91.
[17]
Ramachandra T., Mahapatra D. M., KS A., and Varghese S. FOAMING OR ALGAL BLOOM IN WATER BODIES OF INDIA: REMEDIAL MEASURES-RESTRICT PHOSPHATE (P) BASED DETERGENTS. Energy, 2017.
[18]
Zhang W., Jin X., Liu D., Lang C., and Shan B. Temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen and phosphorus and eutrophication assessment for a typical arid river—Fuyang River in northern China. Journal of Environmental Sciences, 2017. 55: 41-8.
[19]
Hall E. R., Muller E. M., Goulet T., Bellworthy J., Ritchie K. B., and Fine M. Eutrophication may compromise the resilience of the Red Sea coral Stylophora pistillata to global change. Marine pollution bulletin, 2018. 131: 701-11.
[20]
Choi Y.-Y., Baek S.-R., Kim J.-I., Choi J.-W., Hur J., Lee T.-U., Park C.-J., and Lee B. J. Characteristics and biodegradability of wastewater organic matter in municipal wastewater treatment plants collecting domestic wastewater and industrial discharge. Water, 2017. 9 (6): 409.
[21]
Asghar M. Z., Arshad A., Hong L., Riaz M., and Arfan M. Comparative assessment of physico-chemical parameters of waste water effluents from different industries in Lahore, Pakistan. Proceedings of the International Academy of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, 2018. 8 (2): 99-112.
[22]
Haande S., Rohrlack T., Semyalo R. P., Brettum P., Edvardsen B., Lyche-Solheim A., Sørensen K., and Larsson P. Phytoplankton dynamics and cyanobacterial dominance in Murchison Bay of Lake Victoria (Uganda) in relation to environmental conditions. Limnologica-Ecology and Management of Inland Waters, 2011. 41 (1): 20-9.
[23]
DeLaune R., Pezeshki S., Pardue J., Whitcomb J., and Patrick Jr W. Some influences of sediment addition to a deteriorating salt marsh in the Mississippi River deltaic plain: a pilot study. Journal of Coastal Research, 1990: 181-8.
[24]
DEMPSTER J., MANNING W., HAVENS K., JONES K., and TANABE S. ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION Environmental fo//ufion.
[25]
Kay D. and McDonald A. T. Water quality issues. Applied Geography, 1991. 11 (3): 171-7.
Open Science Scholarly Journals
Open Science is a peer-reviewed platform, the journals of which cover a wide range of academic disciplines and serve the world's research and scholarly communities. Upon acceptance, Open Science Journals will be immediately and permanently free for everyone to read and download.
CONTACT US
Office Address:
228 Park Ave., S#45956, New York, NY 10003
Phone: +(001)(347)535 0661
E-mail:
LET'S GET IN TOUCH
Name
E-mail
Subject
Message
SEND MASSAGE
Copyright © 2013-, Open Science Publishers - All Rights Reserved