Welcome to Open Science
Contact Us
Home Books Journals Submission Open Science Join Us News Unsubscribe Page
Exploring the Self-Reported Well-Being Attributes in Anxiety and Depression
Current Issue
Volume 5, 2018
Issue 3 (May)
Pages: 28-37   |   Vol. 5, No. 3, May 2018   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 10   Since Aug. 5, 2018 Views: 64   Since Aug. 5, 2018
Authors
[1]
Ashkan Farhadi, Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, USA.
Abstract
Subjective well-being (SWB) is one of the direct measures of our mental health and overall wellbeing. Our objective was to explore whether, the factors that contribute to our sense of well-being could also correlate with prevalence and severity of anxiety and depression. We used an anonymous online survey and recruited 416 study subjects using social media as the main method of recruitment. We gathered demographic information, self-reported anxiety and depression as well GAD-7 and PHQ-9 questionnaire for evaluating anxiety and depression, assessed several well-being attributes, and SWB. The overall sense of subjective well-being and most well-being attributes in our study were negatively associated with both self-reported and objective assessment of anxiety and depression. In addition, the household income showed a negative correlation with the prevalence of anxiety and depression. In this study, we showed that SWB, and several well-being attributes that contribute to the sense of overall contentment, are negatively affected in those with anxiety and depression. We also showed that household income was negatively correlated with the prevalence of anxiety and depression. Recognizing the specifics of the disturbed personality traits could open a new horizon for helping these individuals using more specific forms of psychological interventions.
Keywords
Subjective Wellbeing, Anxiety, Depression, Happiness, Survey
Reference
[1]
Linton MJ, Dieppe P, Medina-Lara A. Review of 99 self-report measures for assessing well-being in adults: exploring dimensions of well-being and developments over time. BMJ. 2016; 6: 1-16.
[2]
Ryff CD. Happiness is everything, or is it? Explorations on the meaning of psychological well-being. J Personal Social Psych. 1989; 57: 1069-81.
[3]
Ryan RM, Deci EL. On happiness and human potentials: a review of research on hedonic and eudaimonic well-being. Annu Rev Psychol. 2001; 52: 141-66.
[4]
Diener E. Subjective well-being. The science of happiness and a proposal for a national index. Am Psychol. 2000; 55: 34-43.
[5]
Hervas G, Vazquez C. Construction and validation of a measure of integrative well-being in seven languages: The Pemberton Happiness Index. Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2013; 11: 66-79.
[6]
Topp CW, ostergaard SD, Sondergaard S, et al. The WHO-5 Well-Being Index: a systematic review of the literature. Psychother Psychosom 2015; 84: 167-176.
[7]
Wells KB, Stewart A, Hays RD The functioning and well-being of depressed patients. Results from the Medical Outcomes Study. JAMA. 1989; 262: 914-9.
[8]
Golub NI, Winters PC, van Wijngaarden E. A population-based study of blood lead levels in relation to depression in the United States. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2010; 83: 771-7.
[9]
Grant F, Guille C, Sen S. Well-Being and the Risk of Depression under Stress. Plos One. 2013; 8: 1-6.
[10]
Maurino J, Sanjuan J, Haro JM et al. Impact of depressive symptoms on subjective well-being: the importance of patient-reported outcomes in schizophrenia. Dovepress 2011; 5: 471-4.
[11]
Yadav RK, Magan D, Mehta M et al. A short-term, comprehensive, yoga-based lifestyle intervention is efficacious in reducing anxiety, improving subjective well-being and personality,. Int J Yoga 2012; 5: 134-9.
[12]
Ozcakir A, Oflu Dogan F, Cakir YT et al. Subjective Well-Being among Primary Health Care Patients. Plos One 2014; 9: 1-15.
[13]
Kinderman P, Tai S, Pontin E et al. Causal and mediating factors for anxiety, depression and well-being
. B J Psych 2015; 206: 456–60.
[14]
Keyes CL, Annas J. Feeling good and functioning well: distinctive concepts in ancient philosophy and contemporary science. J Pos Psych 2009; 4: 197-201.
[15]
Hogan MJ, Leyden KM, Conway R et al. Happiness and health across the lifespan in five major cities: The impact of place and government performance. Soc Sci Med. 2016; 162: 168-76
[16]
Zautra A, Hempel A. Subjective well-being and physical health/ a narrative literature review with suggestions for future research. Int J Aging Hum Dev. 1984; 19: 91-110.
[17]
Koivumaa-Honkanen H, Kaprio j, Honkanen rj et al. 
The stability of life satisfaction in a 15-year follow-up of adult Finns healthy at baseline. BMC Psychiatry 2005; 5: 4-12.
[18]
Lyubomirsky S, King L, Diener E. The benefits of frequent positive affect: does happiness lead to success? Psychol Bull. 2005; 131: 803-55.
[19]
Helliwell J, Layard R, Sachs J. World Happiness Report. New York, NY: The Earth Institute, Columbia University; 2012.
[20]
Farhadi A, Banton D, Keefer L. Connecting our gut feeling and how our gut feels: The role of well-being attributes in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. J Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2018; 24: 289-298.
[21]
Kessler RC, Berglund P, Demler O et al. Lifetime prevalence and age-of-onset distributions of DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005; 62: 593-602.
[22]
Rotenstein LS, Ramos MA, Torre M et al. Prevalence of Depression, Depressive Symptoms, and Suicidal Ideation Among Medical Students: A Systematic Review and Meta- Analysis. JAMA 2016; 316: 2214-36.
[23]
Beutel ME, Junger C, Klein EM et al. Depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation among 1st and 2nd generation migrants - results from the Gutenberg health study. BMC Psychiatry 2016; 16: 288
[24]
Cyranowski JM, Schott LL, Kravitz HM et al. Psychosocial Features Associated with Lifetime Comorbidity of Major Depression and Anxiety Disorders Among a Community Sample of Mid-Life Women: The SWAN Mental Health Study. Depress Anxiety. 2012; 29: 1050–7
[25]
BlancoC, Rubio J, Wall M et al. RISK FACTORS FOR ANXIETY DISORDERS: COMMON AND SPECIFIC EFFECTS IN A NATIONAL SAMPLE. Depress Anxiety. 2014; 31: 756–64.
[26]
Kelly MM, Tyrka AR, Price LH et al. SEX DIFFERENCES IN THE USE OF COPING STRATEGIES: PREDICTORS OF ANXIETY AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS. Depress Anxiety. 2008; 25: 839–46.
[27]
Gater R, Tansella M, Korten A et al. Sex differences in the prevalence and detection of depressive and anxiety disorders in general health care settings: report from the World Health Organization Collaborative Study on Psychological Problems in General Health Care. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1998; 55: 405-13.
[28]
Kader Maideen SF, Sidik SM, Rampal L et al. Prevalence, associated factors and predictors of depression among adults in the community of Selangor, Malaysia. PLoS One. 2014; 9: e95395.
[29]
Hoebel J, Maske UE, Zeeb H et al. Social Inequalities and Depressive Symptoms in Adults: The Role of Objective and Subjective Socioeconomic Status. PLoS One 2017; 12: e0169764.
[30]
Gullich I, Silva Duro SM, Cesar JA. Depression among the elderly: a population-based study in Southern Brazil. Rev. bras. epidemiol. 2016; 19: 691-701.
[31]
Wyshak G. Income and Subjective Well-Being: New Insights from Relatively Healthy American Women, Ages 49-79. PLoS ONE 2016; 11: e0146303.
[32]
Cho J, Martin P, Margrett J et al. The Relationship between Physical Health and Psychological Well-Being among Oldest-Old Adults. J Aging Res 2011; 3: 8.
[33]
Davies C, Knuiman M, Michael R. The art of being mentally healthy: a study to quantify the relationship between recreational arts engagement and mental well-being in the general population. BMC Public Health 2016; 16: 15-25.
[34]
Gull F, Dawood S. Religiosity and Subjective Well-Being amongst Institutionalized Elderly in Pakistan. Health Promotion Perspectives, 2013; 3; 124-128.
[35]
Pereira-Morales AJ, Adan A, Lopez-Leon S, Forero DA. Personality traits and health-related quality of life: the mediator role of coping strategies and psychological distress. Ann Gen Psychiatry. 2018; 17; 25.
[36]
Semino LN, Marksteiner J, Brauchle G, Danay E. Depressive Symptoms and Their Interactions With Emotions and Personality Traits Over Time: Interaction Networks in a Psychiatric Clinic. Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2017; 13; 19.
Open Science Scholarly Journals
Open Science is a peer-reviewed platform, the journals of which cover a wide range of academic disciplines and serve the world's research and scholarly communities. Upon acceptance, Open Science Journals will be immediately and permanently free for everyone to read and download.
CONTACT US
Office Address:
228 Park Ave., S#45956, New York, NY 10003
Phone: +(001)(347)535 0661
E-mail:
LET'S GET IN TOUCH
Name
E-mail
Subject
Message
SEND MASSAGE
Copyright © 2013-2017, Open Science Publishers - All Rights Reserved