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Prevalence of Antenatal Depression Among Pregnant Women in Khartoum Maternity Hospital in Sudan
Current Issue
Volume 2, 2015
Issue 4 (August)
Pages: 141-145   |   Vol. 2, No. 4, August 2015   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 32   Since Aug. 28, 2015 Views: 1700   Since Aug. 28, 2015
Authors
[1]
Siddig Omer Handady, Department of Obstetrical and Gynecology, Imperial Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan.
[2]
Hajar Hassan Sakin, Department of Obstetrical and Gynecology, Royal Hayat Maternity Hospital, Kuwait, Elkwait.
[3]
Khalid Yassin M. Ahmed, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Al Neelain University, Khartoum, Sudan.
[4]
Awad Ali M. Alawad, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Medical Sciences and Technology, Khartoum, Sudan.
Abstract
Background: Depression during pregnancy is particularly significant not just because of the consequences to the health of the mother, but also the potential deleterious effects on the developing fetus. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of antenatal depression among pregnant women during antenatal follow up and to determined risk factors of antenatal depression. Materials and Methods: It was cross-sectional and hospital based study conducted in Khartoum Maternity hospital, during one year (July 2011 – July 2012). A total of 1000 women were chosen as proportion of total number of pregnant women attending the refer clinic. A multistage random sampling technique was used to select the study sample. A detailed and structured questionnaire was filled directly by women. Results: A total of 1000 women participated in this study. The mean age of women was 29.5 + 5.2 years. 134 (13.4%) of women had depression, out of 134, 45(4.5%) were mild, 61 (6.1%) were moderate and 28(2.8%) were had severe depression. The study find significant statistical association between depression and the following variables: p value < 0.05, age, duration of marriage, number of pregnancy, husband support and family history of psychiatric. Conclusion: The present study concludes that almost 13.4% of these women are experiencing moderate levels of depressive symptoms. As well, there are implications for practice, theory, policy, and knowledge translation.
Keywords
Depression, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Antenatal
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