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Role of Personality Assessment of Intending Applicants into Religious Life
Current Issue
Volume 2, 2015
Issue 4 (August)
Pages: 123-128   |   Vol. 2, No. 4, August 2015   |   Follow on         
Paper in PDF Downloads: 28   Since Aug. 28, 2015 Views: 1424   Since Aug. 28, 2015
Authors
[1]
Ifeacho Chinwe I., Department of Psychology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.
[2]
Aroyewun B. Afolabi, Clinical Service Department, Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria.
Abstract
This paper proposes the role of personality assessment for applicants into religious life in the Roman Catholic Church. In addition to accumulating information on evaluating mental illness and pathology, in recent decades there has been renewed interest in understanding and assessing optimal human functioning. Psychological expertise in the domains of diagnostic and strengths/weaknesses to identify existing pathology and functional/ dysfunctional behaviours is been used. The role of the evaluating psychologist is to provide the diagnostic information in no uncertain terms, along with clear recommendations for treatment and warnings if treatment recommendations are not followed. A thoughtful psychological assessment offers valuable information to the candidate; leadership and other involved in formation so that critical decisions regarding ordination, licensure and/or future placement can be made with the greatest likelihood of success for all concerned.
Keywords
Role, Personality Assessment, Intending Applicant, Religious Life
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